His Civil War Novel

William Valentine

Mrs. Moore

English II p.4

25 May 2018

Poor Man's Literature

Section 1: Intro (Hook/Interest Grabber and Historical Context)

“Capturing every leaf on every tree is a time-consuming and, some would say, thankless task” - Anonymous. The new depictions in Realism gave new perspectives and represented a more common demographic. In America, tensions heightened between the North and South over the abolition of slavery. The Compromise of 1850 sat in the heart of the realism time period. This new set of Bills abolished slave trade in certain regions, giving new freedoms and equality to individuals.

(Philosophical Context)

Realism was an art movement that rejected he emotional and extraneous themes of Romanticism. Artists and writers began to explore the reality of everyday life. A painting to come out of this period would likely depict farmers working the land or men working in coal mines. Artists depicted the real world exactly as it appears. They painted everyday subjects and people, therefore the popular opinion of the art was positive and was supported by the people at the time because of the many advocates of freedom during the time historically. The ever growing lower middle class supported Realism because of the acknowledgment representation it gave them in art.

(Literary Context and Thesis)

Realism concerned itself with how life was structured socially, economically, politically, and culturally in the mid-19th century. This led to sometimes "ugly" portrayals of life's unpleasant moments. Social Realists during the 19th century, were workers and laborers, the ones who toiled in factories and fields. The artists were able to connect with working classes. The artists believed they were critical members of the whole society, rather than living among the elite class.

Section 2: Artist 1 Painter (Thomas Eakins)

“Raw Art”

Bio Info-

Thomas Eakins, (born July 25, 1844, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.—died June 25, 1916, Philadelphia), painted mainly portraits of his friends and scenes of outdoor sports, such as swimming and boating. Got natural art talent from his writing master father. He did well in school, especially in science and mathematics. Thomas studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

Connection to Literary Movement

“Diamond in the Rough”

Eakins work was some of the earliest works of realism, therefore its distaful nature was particularly harsh. Along with this, Eakins had very graphic paintings that depicted difficult times and jobs people had to do. The things Eakins paintedwere never previously depicted which progressed the realism movement a lot further

Analysis of Work-

The painting objectively records the drama of contemporary life. Full of feeling but free of sentimentality. The Gross Clinic is generally agreed to be Eakins’s masterpiece. His work wasreceived with distaste by his peers because of its unsentimental nature. Eakins work was some of the earliest works of realism, therefore its distaful nature was particularly harsh.

Section 3: Artist 2 (Stephen Crane)

“The Great Awakening Poet”

Bio Info-Stephen Crane was born in New Jersey on November 1, 1871. His Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage (1895) realistically depicts the psychological complexities of battlefield emotion and has become a literary classic. He died at the age of 28 on June 5, 1900 in Germany.

Connection to Literary Movement

“Sticks and Stones”

Produced works that have been credited with establishing the foundations of modern American naturalism and realism. His book Maggie Astory of an innocent and abused girl's descent into prostitution and her eventual suicide, Maggie was initially rejected by several publishers who feared that Crane's description of slum life would shock readers.

Analysis of Work-

Produced works that have been credited with establishing the foundations of modern American naturalism and realism. His Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage (1895) realistically depicts the psychological complexities of battlefield emotion and has become a literary classic.He is also known for authoring Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

Section 4: Artist 3 Mark Twain

“No Fake News”

Bio Info- Born on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri, Samuel L. Clemens wrote under the name Mark Twain. He was also a riverboat pilot, journalist, lecturer, entrepreneur and inventor. Twain died on April 21, 1910, in Redding, Connecticut.

Connection to Literary Movement

“Mark Twain Strictly Prohibited”

-Mark Twain is noted to be part of the Realist or Realism Movement in literature.Twain's works depicted every day and mundane activities and experiences, instead of a romanticized presentation.Twain had once made his living by becoming an established reporter, so it’s easy to assume that the skills he obtained during that time surely assisted in the writing of his novels during the realist movement.

Analysis of Work- Realism focuses on the lifestyle of everyday people among the middle and lower classes, where character is a product of social factors.Prior to this time novels only depicted the higher classes.Twain was notable for his faithful reproduction of the native dialect of a specific population and their vocabulary.In doing this, Twain’s works were extremely unique and controversial. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the most frequently banned books in the public school system. It’s no doubt that certain language in the book is indeed offensive; however Twain was only representing honest speech from that time period. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was in all reality an astounding leap forward in racial awareness.For the first time ever you have a freed slave, Jim, who is as fully realized a character as Tom or Huck.Until this story, no one of such low class had ever been the main focus of any story.Jim was not only portrayed as a slave, but as a human being with the same fears, dreams, feelings, and emotions as any other person on earth.Jim was a likeable character as well.

Conclusion

Works Cited

Jules David Prown, “Thomas Eakins.” Biography Reference Center. Vol. 2, no. 1, Spring 2012. Ebsco Host. Accessed 15 April. 2018

Jules David Prown, “Thomas Eakins.” Biography Reference Center. Vol. 2, no. 2, Spring 2012. Ebsco Host. Accessed 15 April. 2018

Jules David Prown, “Thomas Eakins.” Biography Reference Center. Vol. 1, no. 2 , Spring 2012. Ebsco Host. Accessed 15 April. 2018

Columbia University Press “Realism in Press” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia 6th Edition. Spring 2017. History Reference Center - Publications. Accessed 12 April 2018

Warner Berthoff “The Modern Language Review”The Ferment Of Realism: American Literature. 1884-1919. Vol. 80, No. 4 Pg. 918-919. JSTOR. Accessed 12 April 2018

Watts, Tim “American Literature” American History, ABC-CLIO, 2018, 1994, Accessed 12 April 2018

Pearson, John “Mark Twain” Biography Reference Center Vol. 3 no. 2, Ebsco Host, Accessed 16 April 2018

Pearson, John “Mark Twain” Biography Reference Center Vol. 3 no. 2, Ebsco Host, Accessed 16 April 2018

Pearson, John “Mark Twain” Biography Reference Center Vol. 3 no. 2, Ebsco Host, Accessed 16 April 2018

The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica “Crane, Stephen” Britannica Biographies, 3/1/2012, Ebsco Host, Accessed 15 April 2018

The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica “Crane, Stephen” Britannica Biographies, 3/1/2012, Ebsco Host, Accessed 15 April 2018

The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica “Crane, Stephen” Britannica Biographies, 3/1/2012, Ebsco Host, Accessed 15 April 2018