Alfred Stieglitz

Development of Modern Art in America: Alfred Stieglitz

Alfred Stieglitz once said, “Wherever there is light, one can photograph”. At that time, photography was not considered Fine Art. Many people believed that the meaning of art was hard work and creativity. The people believed photography was boring, and it didn’t take as much time and creativity as any other Fine Art. Alfred Stieglitz insisted in the acceptance of photography as a Fine Art, he said that a photograph reflected reality and it had no needof writing because people could see everything a photograph had to say. It was because of his hard work and his faith that photography is seen as a Fine Art today. Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history. He had a positive impact on the world through the development and acceptance of photography into Modern Art in America.

To begin, Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history. He had a positive impact on the world through the development and acceptance of photography into Modern Art in America. Alfred Stieglitz was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, in 1864. His parents were originally from Germany and migrated to the U.S seeking for a better life. Alfred Stieglitzwas the oldest son of six children. His father was a profitable business owner and an amateur painter. Both parents were supportive of arts (Congdon and Hallmark 299). Stieglitz’s family moved to Berlin where he began his studies in mechanical engineering. However, he also soon abandoned these studies to pursue his interest in photography, for which he had the support of his family. He started to formally study photography while living in Germany in 1883 (Congdon and Hallmark 299). After taking a photochemistry course taught by the eminent scientist Wilhelm Voger in 1883, Stieglitz became fascinated by photography. At the age of 19, he took his first photographic picture. In 1887 he received a prize that were his first hundreds, for the photograph “A Good Jake”, taken from his series about Italian Farmers (Warren and Lynne 1494). Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history that had a positive impact on the worldbecause from the beginning of his career he believed in photography and developed it’s acceptance into Modern Art.

To add, Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history. He had a positive impact on the world through the development and acceptance of photography into Modern Art in America. When Stieglitz started taking photographs in the 1880s, the medium was still in its infancy, seen as something to be utilized for recording and descriptive purposes. However, he regarded the camera as a tool, just as a paintbrush, and was determined to put photography on the same level as other art forms, such as painting and sculpture (“Alfred Stieglitz” Biography in Context). Alfred Stieglitz decided to take matter into his own hands, and in 1902 Stieglitz organized artists who were interested in seeking a new approach to photography. Artists who embraced a new aesthetic and purpose for photography as a new form of artistic expansion banded together into what became known as the Photo-Secessionist to create images that resembled paintings(Warren and Lynne 1495 ). Alfred Stieglitz was the most famous American Pictorialists leading a movement that contributed greatly to the development of photography and it's acceptance in art (Warren and Lynne 1494).During 1900's Stieglitz opened a gallery art at 219 Fifth Avenue that became known as the " The Little Galleries of photo-Sessions or Gallery 219". The idea of Photo-Sessions was to create a new photographic language where photography would be received as a fine art (Warren and Lynne 1495). Some time later, Stieglitz successively ran three New York galleries, through which he organized the first exhibitions in the U.S. of works by Henri Matisse, Georges Braque, Pablo Picasso, and Paul Cezanne, among others. He was one of the first prominent supporters of American modernist artists such as Georgia O'Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, and Charles DeMuth. Stieglitz died in 1946 (“Alfred Stieglitz” Biography in Context).Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history that had a positive impact on the worldbecause from the beginning of his career he believed in photography and developed it’s acceptance into Modern Art.

Next, Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history. He had a positive impact on the world through the development and acceptance of photography into Modern Art in America. While the world was changing around him, Stieglitz became a guiding force in shaping American culture through his work as a photographer and art impresario (“Alfred Stieglitz” Biography in Context). Stieglitz took a trip to Europe were he was inspired to photograph everything he saw. By showing people from varied economic backgrounds and the condition under which they lived, Stieglitz felt that his work showed a deeper understanding of human condition. This trip resulted in his Streerage Series (Congdon and Hallmark 301). Later on Stieglitz adopted artists and became known as the Stieglitz circle, including painter John Marin, Dove, and perhaps most profoundly was the artist who would later become his wife Georgia O'keeffe (Congdon and Hallmark 301). Later on, new insights into his work were being offered in an exhibition, "Alfred Stieglitz: Known and Unknown," at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Tex., through Jan. 5, 2003. It emphasizes lesser-known images and places them in context and some of his most-celebrated photographs (“Alfred Stieglitz” Biography in Context). Stieglitz championed the romanticized images of pictorialism, and often spent hours waiting for just the right atmosphere to develop. Later, the strong geometric shapes of modern painting and flattened images of Japanese printmaking influenced his work, but he decided that photography should not be like painting and embraced sharply focused "straight" photography. Still later, he sought to make photographs that were the pictorial equivalents of emotional responses, similar to music (“Alfred Stieglitz” Biography in Context). In the meantime, Alfred Stieglitz promoted imaginative manipulation of photographic image. People thought Alfred's work aimed an expression rather than realism. Yet he disagreed with their philosophy and maintained that photography should reflect reality and indeed photography was not a fine art medium, such as painting or sculpture (Congdon and Hallmark 299). Stieglitz was determined to establish photography as a fine art. However, there was much debate on the topic at this time. Opposing arguments suggested that photography was a lazy form of painting and that photographers were artists who did not want to take the time to develop traditional art and techniques. These oppositions fueled Stieglitz's drive for the quest and he spent the next several decades providing his claim that indeed photography was art(Congdon and Hallmark 300). In answer to a challenge that his photographs' power was due to his hypnotic influence over his sitters, Stieglitz began to photograph clouds, to show, as he wrote in 1923, "that my photographs were not due to subject matter." He called these photographs "Equivalents," and they almost rivaled abstract art in their beauty of form and chiaroscuro (Congdon and Hallmark 300). Soon the United States joined European allies in World War 1 against Germany and Austria. Many of the studio 219 artists, including Edward Steichen, joined the U.S military, and the central group of people at the gallery has dispersed (Congdon and Hallmark 301). Soon the gallery and Stieglitz himself were considered a threat for the war effort, which resulted in economic hardship for him and his family and prompted the closing of the gallery and the closing of the publication Camera Works (Congdon and Hallmark 301). Years later, Stieglitz had a heart attack, but he recovered soon and after his heart attack in 1937, Stieglitz said that his heart condition precluded him from being able to travel. Stieglitz and his wife O'keeffe made a pact and spent the winter together in New York City at the Manhattan Shelton (Congdon and Hallmark 301-2).Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history that had a positive impact on the world because from the beginning of his career he believed in photography and developed it’s acceptance into Modern Art.

Finally,Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history. He had a positive impact on the world through the development and acceptance of photography into Modern Art in America. Although Stieglitz was no longer able to take photographs after his heart attack, he continued to curate exhibitions, promoted artists, and published art criticism until his death on 1946 in New York City (Congdon and Hallmark 302). Alfred Stieglitz was one of the key figures in photography of the 20th century and the development of Modern art in America. A man who wrote several hats photographer, editor, gallery owner, essayist - He devoted himself to all of these activities with the same passion and success (Warren and Lynne 1494). Alfred Stieglitz was considered by many people the Father Of Photography. Alfred Stieglitz dedicated his life to the pursuit of the medium as fine art (Congdon and Hallmark 302). This resulted in a vast photographic oeuvre, critical writing, and publications, and the support of leading artists that influenced the acceptance of photography as a fine art (302). Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history that had a positive impact on the worldbecause from the beginning of his career he believed in photography and developed it’s acceptance into Modern Art.

In conclusion, Alfred Stieglitz was an important figure in the American history. He had a positive impact on the world through the development and acceptance of photography into Modern Art in America. Alfred Stieglitz chose to step out of traditional bonds of art such as painting, drawing, and sculpture. Stieglitz stood up and fought for photography, so people could see photography as equal as any other fine arts. In doing so, he showed his photographs and the work of others throughout the United States. He allied with other artists and photographers and together showed the world that photography was like any other art, the only difference was that photography showed nothing but reality. This made people think that photography didn’t take as much time as the other types of art, but Stieglitz did not want people to compare photography with painting or other art.Stieglitz wanted people to see photography as Modern Art. Alfred Stieglitz was a big influence in the art world. He dedicated his entire life to fight for photography until his last day. After he died the world started to see photography as a Fine Art and soon photography was accepted as Modern Art.