Columbia University Press

Name of Student

Footnote format in Chicago referencing style

History

In Chicago referencing style, citation of various literary sources are done in two formats, both in using notes as well as bibliography, and using the author-date format. In the note and bibliography format, two versions exists, the footnote and bibliography plus the endnote and bibliography style. This article seeks to provide an example of how referencing can be done using the footnote plus bibliography format.

Footnotes

  1. Ruth Rogaski, Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in

Treaty-port China (Berkeley, California: Univ of California Press, 2004),

19-20.

  1. Christopher A. Reed, Gutenberg in Shanghai: Chinese Print Capitalism, 1876-1937 The Hub of the Wheel’: Commerce, Technology, and Organizational Innovation in Shanghai’s New-Style Publishing World, 1876-c.1911 (Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 2004), 165-189.

  2. Han Bangqing, The Sing-song Girls of Shanghai, ed. Eva Hung, trans. Eileen Chang (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005), 74-75.

  3. Laikwan Pang, "Photography, Performance, and the Making of Female

Images in Modern China," Journal of Women’s History 27, no. 4 (2005): 63.

  1. Y. Yvon Wang, "Whorish Representation: Pornography, Media, and

Modernity in Fin-de-siecle Beijing," Modern China 40, no. 4, 385.

  1. Christopher G. Rea, “He’ll Roast All Subjects That May Need the Roasting: Puck and Mr. Punch in Nineteenth-Century China,” in AT, edit. Hans Harder and Barbara Mittler

(Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2013), 420-421

  1. Jonathan Hay, is “Notes on Chinese Photography and Advertising in Late

Nineteenth-Century Shanghai,” 99 & 113, and, Carrie Waara, “The Bare Truth:

Nudes, Sex, and the Modernization Project in Shanghai Pictorials,” 187,

in Visual Culture in Shanghai, ed. Jason C. Kuo (Stanford University Press, 1997).

  1. Wen-hsin Yeh, afterword to Visual Culture in Shanghai, ed. Jason

C. Kuo (Stanford University Press, 1997), 333-346.

  1. Nga-li Lam, New World, ‘New World Daily’ and the Culture of

Amusement in Early Republican Shanghai, PhD diss., Hong Kong

University of Science and Technology, 2015.

  1. Y. Yvon Wang, "Whorish Representation: Pornography, Media, and

Modernity in Fin-de-siecle Beijing," Modern China 40, no. 4.

Bibliography

Bangqing, Han. The Sing-song Girls of Shanghai. Edited by Eva Hung. Translated by Eileen Chang. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005.

Hay, Jonathan. “Notes on Chinese Photography and Advertising in Late Nineteenth-Century Shanghai,” and Waara, Carrie. “The Bare Truth: Nudes, Sex, and the Modernization Project in Shanghai Pictorials.” In Visual Culture in Shanghai, edited by Jason C. Kuo 163-204, and 336-346.Stanford University Press, 1997.

Lam, Nga-li. New World, ‘New World Daily’ and the Culture of Amusement in Early Republican Shanghai. PhD diss., Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 2015.

Pang, Laikwan. "Photography, Performance, and the Making of Female Images in Modern China." Journal of Women’s History27, no. 4 (2005): 56-85.

Rea, Christopher G. “He’ll Roast All Subjects That May Need the Roasting: Puck and Mr. Punch in Nineteenth-Century China.” In AT, edited by Hans Harder and Barbara Mittler, 389-422. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2013.

Reed, Christopher A. Gutenberg in Shanghai: Chinese Print Capitalism, 1876-1937. Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 2004.

Rogaski, Ruth. Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-port China. Berkeley, California: Univ of California Press, 2004.

Wang, Y. Yvon. "Whorish Representation: Pornography, Media, and Modernity in Fin-de-siecle Beijing." Modern China40, no. 4, 351-92.

Wang, Y. Yvon. "Whorish Representation: Pornography, Media, and Modernity in Fin-de-siecle Beijing." Modern China40, no. 4, 371-72.

Yeh, Wen-hsin. Afterword to Visual Culture in Shanghai, 333-346. Edited by Jason C. Kuo. Stanford University Press, 1997.

In summary, the footnote plus bibliography format is unique. In the footnote, the author’s first names are followed by the last. In the bibliography, the last name is followed by the first name(s).